Sexism in "Y The Last Man"

This topic has been covered from top to bottom, from outrageous resting poses to insanely revealing (and mighty inconvenient) outfits, women in comic books have been overly sexualized to the nth degree. 

Not all comic books, of course, it seems to be mostly reserved for superhero epics rather than literary fodder like 'Ghost World.' 

I've been aware of this for years, obviously, as any female who reads comic books is, but something really triggered my rage yesterday.

I decided to read what some call one of the best graphic novel series, Y: The Last Man. Like the title summarizes, the series revolves around Yorick, the only living male on the planet, where all other men have been killed by some strange disease that has left all women intact. 

Initially I thought this would most definitely be an interesting social experiment, we'd get to see how these women would cope after half the population has died. 

Never in a million years would I have guessed this would be the way. 

The women seemed to be split into two groups, predominantly: those who can't stop mourning their fallen brethren, and women who want to eradicate everything possibly having to do with a phallus. 

Yes, there are the few who are trying to get the world up and running again, but am I to believe that no women are capable of getting power back up an running? No pilots? No fucking garbage women? How has society crumbled, nothing is after the women, they can easily keep on doing what they were doing before the men were killed. 

Yorick is no better. He asks the first woman that he runs into (after he's revealed himself as a man) if she's going to rape him.

What the fuck?

I just could not get past all the insane whatthefuckery in this graphic novel. I've heard it gets better (I could only stomach the first volume) but I'm not sure if I honestly want to put myself through it. 

If you want to read some great graphic novels about incredible women, definitely check out "Persepolis" by Marjane Satrapi, "Death" by Neil Gaiman and "Ghost World" by Daniel Clowes.